Down Syndrome

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What is Downs Syndrome?

 

Individuals with Down syndrome (DS) are becoming increasingly integrated into society and community organizations, such as school, health care systems, work forces, and social and recreational activities. Individuals with Down syndrome possess varying degrees of cognitive delays, from very mild to severe. Most people with Down syndrome have cognitive delays that are mild to moderate.

 

What causes Downs Syndrome?

 

Down syndrome occurs when an individual has a full or partial extra copy of chromosome 21. This additional genetic material alters the course of development and causes the characteristics associated with Down syndrome. People with Down syndrome have an increased risk for certain medical conditions such as congenital heart defects, respiratory and hearing problems. Many of these conditions are now treatable, so most people with Down syndrome lead healthy lives.

 

 Diagnosis of Downs Syndrome?

 

Down syndrome is usually identified at birth by the presence of certain physical traits: low muscle tone, a single deep crease across the palm of the hand, a slightly flattened facial profile and an upward slant to the eyes.  Because these features may be present in babies without Down syndrome, a chromosomal analysis called a karyotype is done to confirm the diagnosis.